Civil War plaque dedication at Warwick Town Hall


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Photos



  • Photos by Roger Gavan Plaque Committee members and researchers Bruce Crandall and Warren McFarland unveiled the plaque.




  • Former Town of Warwick Supervisor Tony Houston, who is also Ellis Camp 124, junior vice-commander and a member of the Plaque Committee, served as emcee.




  • Warwick High School and Honors Program student Alex Morales read from his essay on the history of the long and costly conflict that took the lives of more than 600,00 Americans and wounded 400,000 more.




  • Garett Wood Houston, great-great-great-grandson of Capt. John Wood Houston, who was wounded in 1864, read from a speech his ancestor gave in 1880.




  • Ludger Balan, living historian for the NY 26th U.S. Colored Troops, reported that there weremore than 100,000 black soldiers who fought in the Civil War and more than 4,000 were from New York.




  • Ken Columba of the 15th New York Volunteer Cavalry Co. L, an Orange County Civil War Cavalry Reenactment Unit, stated that his organization tries to honor all those who served, including the Confederate soldiers.




  • From left, Orange County Legislator Paul Ruszkiewicz, Town of Warwick Deputy Supervisor James Gerstner, former Town of Warwick Supervisor Tony Houston and Orange County Legislator Barry Cheney.



Plaque Committee
Bruce Crandall
Tony Houston
Warren McFarland
James Meaney

Funds for the plaque were contributed by:
Peter Barlet
Michael J. Batz
Wisner H. Buckbee
Bruce Crandall
Floyd and Nancy DeAngelo
James A. & Jeanette Drennan
Col. Augustus van Horne Ellis Camp 124 (SUVCW)
Etched in Time Engraving of Warwick
Joan B. Frangos in memory of her great-grandfather, Captain James W. Benedict, Commander, Company D, the "Warwick Boys," 124th NYS Volunteers Regiment, Army of the Potomac
Sue Gardner, Warwick Deputy Town Historian
Tony and Sharon Houston
Dr. Richard Hull, Warwick Town Historian
Nicholas P. Lesando Warwick American Legion Post 214
Warren McFarland
Edward Mullins, Jr., Warwick Police Sergeant
Mary Norman
Francis S. and Joan Putnam in memory of Francis' great-grandfather, James H, Storms
John T. Sly, in memory of his great-great-grandfather, Norman Augustus Sly
Stage & Nathans, LLP
Charles and Tavy Umhey, in memory of Tavy's great-grandfather, John Wood Houston
Town of Warwick
Warwick Police Benevolent Association

More than 700 citizens of Warwick fought in the American Civil War from 1861 to 1865. And on Saturday, Aug. 9, some of their descendents, along with many others, gathered at the Warwick Town Hall to honor these soldiers at an unveiling of a plaque displaying all of their names.

Former Town of Warwick Supervisor Tony Houston, who is also Ellis Camp 124 junior vice-commander and a member of the Plaque Committee, served as emcee.

The Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War (SUVCW) was created by the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) in 1881 to serve as their hereditary successor dedicated to perpetuating the memory of the GAR. Through preservation efforts, teaching history and citizenship and participating in civic events the SUVCW honors all who have patriotically served our country. For more information about the SUVCW, go to www.suvcw.org. The Department of New York, SUVCW can be found at www.suvcw.org/ny/deptny.htm.

Houston pointed out that although the 124th New York Volunteer infantry, known as the "Orange Blossoms," was the largest Warwick Company to serve in the Civil War, there were many other volunteers. And that is why there are 709 names on the plaque.

The Col. Augustus van Horne Ellis Camp 124 of the SUVCW is named for the colonel of the 124th New York Volunteer infantry known as "The Orange Blossoms." The Camp meets at 7:30 p.m. on the last Monday of each month at St. James Episcopal Church on South Street in Goshen. Regular membership is open to any male descendant of a soldier, sailor, marine or member of the Revenue Cutter Service who served the nation during the Civil War,and was honorably discharged or died in the service. Associate memberships are available for men without a hereditary link to a Union veteran, but who demonstrate an interest in the objectives of the SUVCW. More information about The Ellis Camp may be found at www.suvcw.org/ny/ellis/home.htm or contact Jeffrey Albanese at jalb@frontiernet.net.

The New York 26th United States Colored Troups (USCT) is a Civil War reenacting group based in the New York City area, providing educational programs, demonstrations and talks at living-history events and in classrooms. For more information about the group, email NYUSCT@gmail.com.

"I think we may have missed one," later said committee member and researcher Warren McFarland.

Warwick High School and Honors Program student Alex Morales read from his essay on the history of the long and costly conflict to preserve the Union that took the lives of more than 600,00 Americans and wounded more than 400,000 more. The numbers, he reported, greater than in any other American war, are especially startling in view of the much lower population at that time.

Garett Wood Houston, great-great-great-grandson of Capt. John Wood Houston, who was wounded in 1864, then read from a speech his ancestor gave in 1880. Tony Houston has

the original.
Jeffrey Albanese, Ellis Camp 124 Patriotic Instructor and Past Department Commander, explained that his organization, which is open to any male descendant of someone who served our nation during the Civil War, was not a reenactment group but rather designed to preserve the memory of those who fought with the Grand Army of the Republic. He read a letter from the front, written by his great-great-grandfather, Charles Dickerson, to his wife.

Ludger Balan, living historian for the NY 26th U.S. Colored Troops, told the story of David Carll of Oyster Bay, Long Island. Carll, a free black man at the time, who also happens to be the ancestor of actress Venessa Williams, was a private in Company I, 26th Infantry, U.S. Colored Troops (U.S.C.T.), in the final years of the Civil War.

Balan reported that there were over 100,000 black soldiers who fought in the Civil War and over 4,000 were from New York. He urged everyone, especially youngsters, to learn their history.

During the ceremonies, the Warwick Valley Chorale, led by Stanley Curtis, sang several songs ranging from "When Johnny Comes Marching Home," to "Let There be Peace on

Earth."
At the conclusion of the event, Plaque Committee members and researchers Bruce Crandall and Warren McFarland unveiled the plaque.

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